This site will feature mostly images of food and other interesting items.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from timestribunelibrary  1 note
timestribunelibrary:

Shrine to St. Frances X. Cabrini on the grounds of St. Lucy’s Church in West Scranton. The shrine was dedicated on June 7, 1998. Times-Tribune Staff Photo
“She was always smiling – her eyes were like two stars” is how Mother Matilda described Mother Cabrini, later to become St. Frances Cabrini, the first American to be canonized a saint by the Roman Catholic Church.
To read more about how St. Frances Cabrini founded a school and convent in Scranton and how that action affected the lives of Scrantonians visit http://blogs.thetimes-tribune.com/pages/index.php/2014/04/20/a-saint-in-scranton/
Also after reading about the first American Saint’s time in Scranton, be sure to check out the collection of articles written by the Times-Tribune Lifestyles staff about the lives of religious sisters in Scranton 
A Question of Faith – Patrice Wilding
 Sisters remain hopeful as fewer women joining religious orders – Caitlin Heaney West 
Nuns face same challenges at aging U.S. society – Patrice Wilding 
Life as nun fulfilling journey toward social goals – Caitlin Heaney West 
Orders of religious working in the Diocese of Scranton – Josh McAuliffe 

timestribunelibrary:

Shrine to St. Frances X. Cabrini on the grounds of St. Lucy’s Church in West Scranton. The shrine was dedicated on June 7, 1998. Times-Tribune Staff Photo

“She was always smiling – her eyes were like two stars” is how Mother Matilda described Mother Cabrini, later to become St. Frances Cabrini, the first American to be canonized a saint by the Roman Catholic Church.

To read more about how St. Frances Cabrini founded a school and convent in Scranton and how that action affected the lives of Scrantonians visit http://blogs.thetimes-tribune.com/pages/index.php/2014/04/20/a-saint-in-scranton/

Also after reading about the first American Saint’s time in Scranton, be sure to check out the collection of articles written by the Times-Tribune Lifestyles staff about the lives of religious sisters in Scranton 

A Question of Faith – Patrice Wilding

 Sisters remain hopeful as fewer women joining religious orders – Caitlin Heaney West 

Nuns face same challenges at aging U.S. society – Patrice Wilding 

Life as nun fulfilling journey toward social goals – Caitlin Heaney West 

Orders of religious working in the Diocese of Scranton – Josh McAuliffe 

Reblogged from todaysdocument  733 notes
todaysdocument:

It’s National Library Week!
Remember being this excited to check out a book? (Maybe you still are.)

From “The Day the Books Went Blank”, a 1961 educational film intended to show the importance of maintaining quality libraries, from The Library Extension Agencies of the six New England States.


The theme of this year’s National Library Week is “Lives Change.”  How has a library, or librarian, changed your life?

todaysdocument:

It’s National Library Week!

Remember being this excited to check out a book? (Maybe you still are.)

From “The Day the Books Went Blank”, a 1961 educational film intended to show the importance of maintaining quality libraries, from The Library Extension Agencies of the six New England States.

The theme of this year’s National Library Week is “Lives Change.”  How has a library, or librarian, changed your life?

Reblogged from timestribunelibrary  2 notes
timestribunelibrary:

“Spartacus” premieres at West Side Theater in true open-night form on June 14, 1961. Klieg lights swept the sky over theater and television and radio broadcast covered first-nighters’ arrival. Featured in colorful activities outside theater were Keystoners Drum and Bugle Corps from Milton, shown here going through drill routine under the marquee. Times Tribune Archives
With the news of a new future for the former Moonshine theater on Adams Ave, got me thinking about another one of Scranton former great theater’s that was redeveloped.  The theater is the West Side Theater that open in November 1, 1926. 
To learn more about this former movie palace visit http://blogs.thetimes-tribune.com/pages/index.php/2014/04/11/lets-go-to-the-movies/ 

timestribunelibrary:

“Spartacus” premieres at West Side Theater in true open-night form on June 14, 1961. Klieg lights swept the sky over theater and television and radio broadcast covered first-nighters’ arrival. Featured in colorful activities outside theater were Keystoners Drum and Bugle Corps from Milton, shown here going through drill routine under the marquee. Times Tribune Archives

With the news of a new future for the former Moonshine theater on Adams Ave, got me thinking about another one of Scranton former great theater’s that was redeveloped.  The theater is the West Side Theater that open in November 1, 1926. 

To learn more about this former movie palace visit http://blogs.thetimes-tribune.com/pages/index.php/2014/04/11/lets-go-to-the-movies/ 

Reblogged from timestribunelibrary  1 note
timestribunelibrary:

On left, the first train to pass over the Nicholson Viaduct on Nov. 6, 1915. At right is Charles E. Booth, conductor on that first train ride. Times-Tribune Archives
Discovered images of the first train to pass over the Nicholson Viaduct (bridge) the other day. It was a great find. 
To see more images of the some of the passengers aboard the first train ride across the Nicholson Viaduct (Bridge) visit: http://blogs.thetimes-tribune.com/pages/index.php/2014/04/04/all-board/

timestribunelibrary:

On left, the first train to pass over the Nicholson Viaduct on Nov. 6, 1915. At right is Charles E. Booth, conductor on that first train ride. Times-Tribune Archives

Discovered images of the first train to pass over the Nicholson Viaduct (bridge) the other day. It was a great find. 

To see more images of the some of the passengers aboard the first train ride across the Nicholson Viaduct (Bridge) visit: http://blogs.thetimes-tribune.com/pages/index.php/2014/04/04/all-board/